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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
action tor the fiscal cliff talks? >> right now, susie, the fiscal cliff talks are clearly the item dejure for the stock market. i think most people expect exactly what eric miller was talking about from the fed. and bern bueno ben bernanke hasn transparent and telling people well in advance what he is going to do. the $85 billion should continue building up for our taxpayers balance sheet. >> susie: how does all of this play out in the markets. all of the bond buying, companies are still holding off from hiring and spending, and now the risk, possibly of a recession. how does it play out in the markets for 2013? >> what has happened, with all of this cash going into the market -- into the economy, not only from the u.s. fed, but from europe, from the central bank there, as well as from china, don't forget, so we've had this liquidity which has taken asset prices with the stock market and the bond markets, pricing it way up, it is actually helping housing after a long wait. moving into the future, there will be some reduction in really the fear that people have. it is not only a lac
. >> susie: investors will beor mn those fiscal cliff talks, and they will also be studying tomorrow's importa")jé:0@6cj& but josh feinman says the november numbers won't give an accurate picture of the labor market. he's chief economist at d.b. advisors. >> reporter: hi, josh, so you're talking about distortions in that report. tell us more. >> yes, hi, susie. i think that the hurricane sandy may distort the numbers. we've seen it in some of the other high frequency data in the last couple of weeks. keep in mind tomorrow's labor market report will report on a snapshot of the labor market taken in the middle of last month. and that's when the hurricane and its aftermath were having their effects. >> so the consensus numbers from a survey of economists, they're expecting american businesses added 110,000 jobs it to their payroll. the unemployment rate staying around 7.9%. does that sit right with you. is that what you are seeing? >> probably somewhere around that maybe a little less. one of the problems is it is hard to gauge exactly what the impact of the storm will have. we know it
's a sense that even if we do get to january 1st. everyone talks about the fiscal cliff but it really is more like a slope, maybe a green bunny slope for when you go skiing, you know. it's not necessarily even a blubl black diamond because the thinking is that if you get there, that's going to be the impetus that both sides need to sit down and get a deal and ultimately it's going to mean republicans voting for a tax cut because rates will have risen for the maitle class and top earners. >> rose: you sound like a steer. >> well i would like to have a ski vacation this winter but i'm not sure anyone will be able to get out on the town. >> rose: one other question and i'll talk about other things saw rounding the whitehouse and decisions the president has to make although his total focus is on this. ceos are coming to the whitehouse has they did today, influential ceos some who gave indications they were not voting for the president in the general election. are they having a different message for him than they had before? do they seem more inkleined to support him where he is on these importa
was one of six governors meeting with president obama today to talk about how the fiscal cliff impacts their states. i asked him what was his message to the president. >> our message was pretty straightforward. we believe that it is important that governors have a seat at the table as the president and leaders in congress are negotiating issues around the fiscal cliff. we think it is really important that they get something done because, obviously, if tax rates go up on middle-class americans come next month, it will be bad for those middle-class americans, it is will be bad for our states, and we're concerned about both the fiscal side and the economic growth side. >> susie: so talk to us a little bit about what kind of deal you would like to see. what were you proposing to the president? >> let's put it this way, if money is just shifted from the federal government to the states, that's not really saving anything. and the president understands that. we think it is really important. recognizing if there are cuts in funds, there ought to be a corresponding reduction in some of the requ
'm susie gharib. a key democrat talks about medicare cuts that could be part of a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with maryland congressman chris van hollen. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. two hurricanes in two years for the northeast-- a region not used to big storms comes to terms with the cleanup and cost. >> susie: and it's green monday, one of the most popular days for online shoppers. we've got details. >>
gharib. a key democrat talks about medicare cuts that could be part of a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with maryland congressman chris van hollen. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. two hurricanes in two years for the northeast-- a region not used to big storms comes to terms with the cleanup and cost. >> susie: and it's green monday, one of the most popular days for online shoppers. we've got details.
what they need to see in a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with delaware governor jack markell. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. a coalition of the nation's top c.e.o.s is feeling pessimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal.
in a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with delaware governor jack markell. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. a coalition of the nation's top c.e.o.s is feeling pessimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal.
than its namesake metals. we'll explain. more tough talk today from washington on the fiscal cliff: treasury secretary timothy geithner said he's willing to go over it if republicans don't agree to tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. president obama said basically the same thing but added one more hard line to the negotiations. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to a debt ceiling vote and take us to the brink of default once again, as part of a budget negotiation-- which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year-- i will not play that game. >> late today the president spoke by telephone with house speaker john boehner. no specifics on what they said to each other, but it was their first conversation in a week. eventually the two sides will get down to bargaining over specifics, including entitlements. one idea may be to change the way the government measures inflation. that may sound like a small change, but, as darren gersh reports, it could have a big impact. >> reporter: if the price of oranges goes up, co
stability in several markets but there's talk about limiting mortgage deductions with the fiscal cliff negotiations sometime next year. couldn't that impact the recovery? >> it could. obviously it might be relegated to more affluent households in terms on of the ability to do a deduction either in full or part. tend of the day there's a large household informq.rjz that's occur that's going to drive perspective homeowners into the market regardless. >> tom: let's get to the pic3sb here. you do like housing stocks with the home builders etf. what do you anticipate. they've had a nice run already. >> they've been terrific. >> tom: put new money to work. >> they've doubled or better and yes we would. they may be subject to profit taking but nonetheless we still think we're in the early innings of the house recovery. >> tom: you also like technology. is this a play on your business investment expectations for next year. >> it is, if business wallets open up we expect the destination for some of that money to go towardsxd more productive enhancing tools and they've been under investing in
report" he is optimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal by the end of they year. maryland congressman chris van hollen talked with our darren gersh, and began with an update on the status of the talks. >> well, the good news is that the president and the speaker of the house are now in face-to-face discussions. it's always better to be talking than not. the other development is that increasingly congressional republicans recognize that the position that they had staked out is unsustainable. >> one of the arguments we hear from some democrats is that the fiscal cliff isn't really a cliff, it's more like a slope and you could gradually go down it and the withholding from tax wouldn't kick in for a while and the spending cuts wouldn't hurt the economy for a while. do you think it is good idea to go over the deliver and it is more of a slope. >> no, i think would be a mistake to go over the fiscal cliff because it could set in motion lots of things that could be a drag on the economy. that being said, i think if it's clear that the parties were working toward a negotiation, that you could
the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. gwen: behind the scenes -- tea party pressure, as the movements most prominent senator builds a new platform. >> a lot of my role in the senate has been stopping bad things and saying no to bad things, but we need to do more than that gwen: abroad, tensions in syria on the rise. can the u.s. intervene? should we? covering the week -- jackie calmes of "new york times," eamon javers of cnbc, amy walter of abc news, and james kitfield of "national journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are work
foray outside washington today, trying to build public support for a fiscal cliff agreement. it came a day after he resumed talking with the top house republican, and as a year-end deadline moved even closer. the president took his public campaign for a deficit deal on his terms to the daimler diesel plant in redford michigan. >> if congress doesn't act soon meaning in the next few weeks, starting on january 1, everybody is going to see their income taxes go up. it's true. y'all don't like that? >> no! woodruff: instead, mr. obama again pressed for raising tax rates on the top two percent of incomes. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans. >> woodruff: his michigan visit came a day after the president and house speaker john boehner met privately at the white house. their first one-on-one session since the election. neither side gave any details about what was discussed. instead they issued
aimed at avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> ifill: then, we look at michigan's debate over right-to- work laws which would prevent labor unions from requiring membership.
from the financial crisis. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the standoff over the fiscal cliff. kwame holman updates the state of the negotiations and we talk with tennessee republican senator bob corker. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fro
for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufacturing dropped 7,000. grinchier still, job growth in september and october was revised down by 49,000 jobs. and for all the talk of a lower unemployment rate, its explanation seemed to be that several hundred thousand more americans stopped looking for work in november and were counted out of the labor force. again, economist holtzer. >> this month's change was driven completely by the fact some people stopped looking. last month's drop in unemployment really was driven by people becoming employed. the fact the unemployment rate has dropped from over 10% over the last two or three years part of that is real job gaining by some people
is "newsweek's" bureau chief and host of cnn's "reliable sources." the last time you were here we talked about how the white house and president was using social media's way of arguing this social -- this fiscal cliff argument. turns out he's not alone. let's look at something we've been seeing this week. >> stop instagramming your breakfast and tweeting your first world problems and getting on youtube so you can see gang 'nam style. ♪ gangnam style >> and start using those sprerbl social media skills to sign people up on this baby. three people a week, let it grow and don't forget, take part or get taken apart. these old coots will clean out the treasury before you get there. >> ifill: "these old coots will clean out the treasury." this is alan simpson in his best but a completely different venue. >> i talked to him today and he said "i think i could go around the world in 90 days and never had the impact that this silly little thing did." and the idea behind this, he's hooked up with "the can kicks back" helping young people try to get involved and get engaged in the fiscal cliff and makin
will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to be back with you. >> rose: we've talked many times about g.e. since you took over, i think once since -- just after 2001. where is the company today in terms of where do you want it to be and where do you want it to be in the next five years? >> i think, charlie, what we've tried to do is simplify the portfolio into infrastructure and financial services. we like where the portfolio is today. we think in the infrastructure space there's going to be roughly $4 trillion spent each year, so it's an attractive big market. globally is where our opportunities are so the company's -- probably a decade ago 30% of our revenues were outside the united states. now it's more like 60% or 65%. so we think we've got the portfolio we want. we've dramatically increased the amount of technology. and in the end i think technology and innovation are the competitive advantage. we've got a good global footprint. we're in 140 countries. and we'
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)